FILM ZERO PRESENTS

A man leaving a bar one night notices a strange figure following him. As he gets closer to home, he realizes it’s not a coincidence and wonders if the pursuer’s intentions are malicious.

The haunting music was composed and recorded by Rick Denzien.

A SHORT TERM EFFECT


From FilmZero

FilmZero is an indie film production team out of Philadelphia. Phil Thomas, one of the hosts of What Are You Afraid of? Directs and writes with the team. We feature their films here.


When a young boy fears monsters in his closet, a father investigates with disturbing results.

Thank you to Music: http://www.purple-planet.com


When a school teacher begins seeing a strange girl appear on his commute home, he suspects it’s just his imagination…until it happens again.

 


Their latest film is an eight minute short entitled “A Short Term Effect” that we shot this past

October. With recent quality contributions to horror such as The Conjuring, Annabelle, You & #39. Next, Lights Out, and Don’t Breathe, it compelled us to do a series of shorts throughout 2017.

It’s a fun ghost story involving a depressed man, some haunted woods and a chance encounter with the girl of his dreams—but will he be able to close the deal? We will be posting other short films every few months as long as people are enjoying them. Please check them out.


37: LIZZIE BORDEN’S AX

Listen to Episode 37: Lizzie Borden’s Ax

Lizzie Borden had an axe
She gave her mother 40 whacks
When she saw what she had done
She gave her father 41

 

Bram Stoker & Shirley Jackson award-winning horror author Lisa Mannetti joins T. Fox Dunham & Phil Thomas for an episode of horror, murder and rebellion on Episode 37 of What Are You Afraid Of? Horror & Paranormal Show. Lisa shares her writing wisdom, what it’s like as a women horror author, a true story about a haunting experience from that ax-wielding Lizzie Borden and a passage from her novella about Harry Houdini, The Box Jumper. Lisa joins us as part of our celebration of Women in Horror in support of Women in Horror Month.

Lisa Mannetti’s debut novel, The Gentling Box, garnered a Bram Stoker Award and she has since been nominated four times for the prestigious award in both the short and long fiction categories: Her story, “Everybody Wins,” was made into a short film and her novella, “Dissolution,” will soon be a feature-length film directed by Paul Leyden. Recent short stories include, “Esmeralda’s Stocking” in Never Fear: Christmas Terrors; “Resurgam” in Zombies: More Recent Dead edited by Paula Guran, and “Almost Everybody Wins,” in Insidious Assassins. Her work, including The Gentling Box, and “1925: A Fall River Halloween” has been translated into Italian.

She has also authored The New Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn, two companion novellas in her collection, Deathwatch, a macabre gag book, 51 Fiendish Ways to Leave your Lover, as well as non-fiction books, and numerous articles and short stories in newspapers, magazines and anthologies. Forthcoming works include “Arbeit Macht Frei” in Gutted: Beautiful Horror Stories and a dark novel about the dial-painter tragedy in the post-WWI era, Radium Girl.

Lisa lives in New York in the 100 year old house she originally grew up in with two wily (mostly) black twin cats named Harry and Theo Houdini.

 

Lisa shares with us the first in a series of her paranormal experiences while visiting the Lizzie Borden house. She’s always been to drawn to Lizzie, which has to worry you a bit.

 

While I was away, the guide and my two new-found friends actually heard someone calling my name over and over, “Lisa, Lisa, Lisa!”

 

–From The Haunted Lizzie Borden House: True Ghost Stories. Written and submitted by Lisa Mannetti

The body of Lizzie’s mother.

 

Hannah Neurotica also comes on this episode as we play part one of T. Fox Dunham’s interview with this founder of Women in Horror Month. This is her first podcast appearance in years, and we’re very happy to have her. She explains how Women In Horror Month started after she suffered prejudice as a woman horror author. Part 2 of the interview, a profile of this talented author & filmmaker will play on our next episode. She’s an inspiring artist, suffering through mental illness to create her work and fight her revolution.

 

Women in Horror Month (WiHM) is an international, grassroots initiative, which encourages supporters to learn about and showcase the underrepresented work of women in the horror industries. Whether they are on the screen, behind the scenes, or contributing in their other various artistic ways, it is clear that women love, appreciate, and contribute to the horror genre.

I think in general when readers choose books, they think women’s horror will be milder and watered-down.

–Lisa Mannetti about women writing in horror

 

The Box Jumper

We end the show with a reading from her fantastic novella, The Box Jumper. Fox and Lisa share a fascination with the master of illusion, his light and dark side. The novella is available from Amazon. Her most recently published longer work, The Box Jumper, a novella about Houdini, has not only been nominated for a 2015 Bram Stoker Award, it won the “Novella of the Year” award from This is Horror in the UK.

Thirty years after his death, one of Houdini’s premier assistants reveals the secrets of his paranormal abilities—but is she telling the truth?

“‘Magic’ is the operative word for this moody novella. The magic of Harry Houdini serves as an overriding backdrop here, but another kind of magic permeates these pages—the magic of fine writing. Don’t expect the usual linear plot, because there is no direct narrative. Vivid dreams, surreal images, hypnotic memories, all serve to flesh out an unsettling tale that sweeps us into a new fictional dimension. Read The Box Jumper and share the magic.”

William F. Nolan, author of Logan’s Run and screenwriter of Burnt Offerings

 

“Seamless delving into the minutia of the period, a compelling main character, and a fine love story in a surround of trickery, fakery and darkness.”

Jack Ketchum, author of OFF SEASON

The Following Man:

Phil Thomas has a new horror short available. It’s an incredible film he talks about on the show, The Following Man. With an incredible music score reminiscent of The Exorcist, watch this brilliant film in his new series of dark shorts.

 

 

 

They’re on PARA-X RADIO at 9PM EST on FRIDAYs.

Follow us on Twitter: @pfwhatafraidof

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Listen for us on PARA-X RADIO at our usual time slot on FRIDAY NIGHTS at 9PM EST.

PMMP LOGO

Sponsored in part by Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing.

RavenAmpersand

MERCY

(A Horror Medical Thriller Novel from Blood Bound Books.)

MERCY LARGE

By T. Fox Dunham

(Host of What Are You Afraid of Horror & Paranormal Podcast)

FANGORIA gives MERCY 3.5 out 4 Skulls – “Dunham has channeled his many brushes with the other side into the exquisitely rendered, lyrical supernatural hospital thriller MERCY.READ FULL REVIEW HERE.

fangoria

tim-waggoner

Author Tim Waggoner

Part medical horror, part supernatural suspense, MERCY is a hard-hitting fever dream of a novel. I enjoyed the hell out of it!” ~ Tim Waggoner, author of The Way of All Flesh and Eat The Night

Pain and poetry flow in equal measure through these pages. Dunham’s prose strikes deep and hits all the right notes. MERCY is unforgettably vivid.” ~ David Dunwoody, author of Hell Walks and The 3 Egos

William Saint is dying of cancer. On most days death seems like a humane alternative to the treatment. Stricken with fever, William is rushed to Mercy—notorious as a place to send the sickest of the poor and uninsured to be forgotten—and finds the hospital in even worse condition than his previous visit. The grounds are unkempt, the foundation is cracking, and like the wild mushrooms sprouting from fissures of decay around it, something is growing inside the hospital. Something dark. It’s feeding on the sickness and sustaining itself on the staff, changing them. And now it wants Willie.

This was my death.

Life is an addiction.

Love is the only force that is real. Read . . . and understand what I saw. I put it in metaphor. You do not understand what you do not understand.

mercy-back-cover

Author of Mercy – T. Fox Dunham

Buy on Kindle at Amazon

Or Buy in Paperback at Amazon

Music Rights:

“Garden Music” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

“The Chamber” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

“Dark Hallway Distressed” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

“Classic Horror” by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

 

 

 

 

 

THE CEREMONY

THE CEREMONY

Set aboard The Queen Mary

Submitted by filmmaker Lynne Hansen

 

Listen to the audio version of the ghost story here, read by Allison Ledbetter from Episode 36: Zombie Girl with horror Filmmaker Lynne Hansen.



 

When you visit one of Time Magazine’s Top Ten Haunted Places, you’d better be prepared. I wasn’t.

In 2005, my novel The Change was nominated for an EPPIE award for Best Young Adult Novel. The black-tie awards ceremony was held in Long Beach, California on the Queen Mary. Ghost sightings on the ship include a sailor who died in the engine room, soldiers who died in a collision during World War II, and a young girl who drowned in the ship’s pool. I was giddy at the chance to have my own ghost adventures on the ship.

I had to get through the awards ceremony first, though. Not only was I nervous about being nominated, but to make it worse, earlier in the night my friend and oft-collaborator Sally Bosco and I had to present the EPPIE award for Best Action Adventure Novel.

We wanted our time on stage to be memorable, so we faked an argument about how difficult it was to write together. As our conversation became more intense, a spirit orb moved toward the stage, and then another, and another. Audience members snapped photos.

Our argument escalated into a fake fistfight, and as our big finale, I threw Sally onto the floor. Photos from the event show her boot sticking out from behind the podium–and 15 spirit orbs all around us.

People applauded. We announced the winner and headed off the stage. We wouldn’t know until later, but four of the orbs seemed to follow us.

There were three stairs coming down from the stage. My gown was floor-length, so I took each stair slowly, carefully. I had both feet squarely on the second step when suddenly my knees buckled. I flew forward onto the floor, landing on my hands and knees .It felt like someone had kicked the back of my knees, but nobody had been directly behind me.

Folks helped me up, and once back in my seat, I took photos of the ceremony. Several had spirit orbs, but none had nearly as many as the photos taken when Sally and I were on stage. There was one more absolutely spectacular photo, though. As the winners for Best Anthology were being awarded their amulets on stage, I took a photo of a bright orb with half a face on the left side, and a multi-layered glowing membrane around the outside. I’d never seen anything like it.

That night my novel The Change won the EPPIE for Best Young Adult Novel and I promptly forgot the shenanigans on stage. I chalked up my fall to clumsiness, and spent the night celebrating. When I finally went back to my stateroom, I couldn’t get any sleep. I thought I was just excited–too wound up to sleep soundly.

Ifell asleep quickly, but awoke time and again to strange voices and odd knocking from inside the room. A high school orchestra group had checked onto the boat that day, so I didn’t think much about it at the time. Odd thing was, my husband didn’t hear the voices at all.

I didn’t discover the photographic evidence of my encounter until I got home.I wonder if the noises weren’t spirits, still trying to show how annoyed they were at me for pushing down my friend.

For the first time in 12 years, I’m going back to the ship this April for Stokercon, the professional conference of the Horror Writers Association. I wonder if the ghosts of the Queen Mary will remember me.

 

36: ZOMBIE GIRL

 

 

Listen to Episode 36: ZOMBIE GIRL:

 

“I am absolutely in love with telling a story in a single image.” Lynne Hansen on film making.

 

Horror maniacs T. Fox Dunham & Phil Thomas return this week to celebrate over 50,000 downloads from our many podcast services with filmmaker Lynne Hansen. Lynne is a lovely and vivacious person who was a joy to speak to on the show. She shares her wisdom and experience as a horror cinematic genius. Lynne was a young adult novelist who found a spontaneous passion for film, a passion matched by her professionalism in the medium. Lynne is the author of a charming zombie movie called He’s Not Looking so Good, which we discuss on the show.  She’s part of the show’s celebration of Women In Horror, which we’ll be doing for the next few months.

 

You can see rent He’s Not Looking so Great on Cineflix

 

Lynne also talks about the award winning CHOMP, which she wrote, produced and directed. It’s a funny little tale about an old lady who sees a young guy walking home from a party dressed as a zombie and captures him, keeping him prisoner in his house. She becomes granny to a zombie. Lynne is currently working on a new film based on one of her husband’s novels–the author Jeff Strand. She’s also a talented book designer with a remarkable list of clients. If you’d like to employ her services, check out her website. She’s the one to watch.

Lynne Hansen is a storyteller who, after directing her first short film Chomp, discovered that she had been studying her entire life to become a filmmaker. She developed a love of all things creepy huddling beneath the covers watching Acri Creature Feature with her dad and big brother. She honed her knowledge of story during her six-year tenure as senior editor for a small press publishing company and as an award-winning author. She developed her eye for visual storytelling designing book covers that required condensing an entire story into a single image. She shepherded her own creative endeavors into the world, and those of others, as a marketing professional, including working with a historic non-profit art-house theater. Having struggled to find her own voice as an artist, Lynne has spoken to students at over 200 schools about how to nurture their own creative spark. In 2014, she was awarded the Buffalo Dreams Fantastic Film Festival Filmmaker to Watch “Dreamer” award. Chomp has screened at over 65 film festivals in 11 countries worldwide, and has won or been nominated for 28 awards, including Best Short Horror Film of 2015 at the Fright Meter Awards. She is currently producing and directing the horror/thriller feature Cold Dead Hands, based on the forthcoming Cemetery Dance novel by Jeff Strand. Learn more at WithoutWarningMedia.com.

 

The official trailer for CHOMP.

THE CEREMONY:

Lynne shares with us two stories, a fictional tale from pioneering America and a true ghost experience that happened to her while attending an award’s ceremony on the Queen Mary. Allison Ledbetter reads this story on Episode 36: Zombie Girl. We’ve included a few pictures from the story of orbs, or what Katie Montana Jordan calls light phenomenon.

 

 

Check out the orbs audience members captured! You can learn more about the ghost stories of the Queen Mary here.

Lynne also shares a horror fiction with the show, Alone 1872, read by our British folksinger, David Walton.

 

            She prayed into the darkness. “Where are you, Will?”

            A soft scratching crept up the wooden door.

            She turned. “Will, is that you?”

            A slobbering muzzle of fangs beneath cold, glowing eyes clamored at the window.

                 —From Alone 1872 by Lynne Hansen.

 

We feature new music on the show, a punk band called Neurotic Wreck curtesy of Vulpanio Records. It’s a dark song with a garage beat. Neurotic Wreck is the project of Dan Shea with guests. From their album Glow Ghosts, One Skin Too Few. Fox is also back with more clown news! The clowns are coming back, thawing with the spring. Clown sightings begin again!

 

They’re on PARA-X RADIO at 9PM EST on FRIDAYs.

Follow us on Twitter: @pfwhatafraidof

para-x-logo_social_400x400

Listen for us on PARA-X RADIO at our usual time slot on FRIDAY NIGHTS at 9PM EST.

PMMP LOGO

Sponsored in part by Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing.

RavenAmpersand

MERCY

(A Horror Medical Thriller Novel from Blood Bound Books.)

MERCY LARGE

By T. Fox Dunham

(Host of What Are You Afraid of Horror & Paranormal Podcast)

FANGORIA gives MERCY 3.5 out 4 Skulls – “Dunham has channeled his many brushes with the other side into the exquisitely rendered, lyrical supernatural hospital thriller MERCY.READ FULL REVIEW HERE.

fangoria

tim-waggoner

Author Tim Waggoner

Part medical horror, part supernatural suspense, MERCY is a hard-hitting fever dream of a novel. I enjoyed the hell out of it!” ~ Tim Waggoner, author of The Way of All Flesh and Eat The Night

Pain and poetry flow in equal measure through these pages. Dunham’s prose strikes deep and hits all the right notes. MERCY is unforgettably vivid.” ~ David Dunwoody, author of Hell Walks and The 3 Egos

William Saint is dying of cancer. On most days death seems like a humane alternative to the treatment. Stricken with fever, William is rushed to Mercy—notorious as a place to send the sickest of the poor and uninsured to be forgotten—and finds the hospital in even worse condition than his previous visit. The grounds are unkempt, the foundation is cracking, and like the wild mushrooms sprouting from fissures of decay around it, something is growing inside the hospital. Something dark. It’s feeding on the sickness and sustaining itself on the staff, changing them. And now it wants Willie.

This was my death.

Life is an addiction.

Love is the only force that is real. Read . . . and understand what I saw. I put it in metaphor. You do not understand what you do not understand.

mercy-back-cover

Author of Mercy – T. Fox Dunham

Buy on Kindle at Amazon

Or Buy in Paperback at Amazon

 

MUSIC RIGHTS:

One Skin Too Few by Neurotic Wreck is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License. Realesed through Vulpiano Records: Glow Ghosts

The Drowned Church by Natural Snow Buildings is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License

Lamentation” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

“The Chamber” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

MORRISON THEATER

THE MORRISON THEATER

Morrison, Colorado

Former brothel

 

Listen to the audio version read by British folksinger, David Walton from EPISODE 34: HORROR WORLD

 

 

Originally the site of a house of…well, let’s just call it a “Gentleman’s Club,”The Morrison Theater shared its space with the city courthouse. The court had the upstairs, the theater the downstairs and for three years I had the great pleasure of working with a very talented group of actors.

Not that I was one of them—it would take a few more years before I built up the nerve (and my nearsightedness got to the point where I couldn’t see the audience) to tread the boards—I was their Stage Manager/Set Builder/Crew and, at least once, literally part of the scenery.

I knew the place was haunted long before I became part of the theater. I used to drive past it every time I visited Morrison and every time I did, I had a “feeling” about the place. So, on my first day as a volunteer I asked the director my usual question: “Who are your ghosts?”

And he told me: there was an old man who liked to wander around the theater, a miner or quarryman, he though, smoking cigars and a couple of “working girls” upstairs in the courthouse. He said he never saw them but from time to time he’d catch a whiff of cigar smoke when he was alone or heard footsteps walking across the floor overhead when he knew the courthouse was empty.

And then, on cue, someone walked across the floor over our heads.

“Like that,” he said.

Of course there was no one upstairs and the courthouse doors were locked.

Over the next few years I became used to the sound of footsteps from the empty room overhead and the scent of cigar smoke—“Jack,” as I dubbed him, seemed to like to hang around while we built the sets—then one particular night I heard something besides footsteps from the empty courthouse.

It was during a performance—a rare one where I didn’t have to hand off a prop or hold up a wall that had suddenly decided to collapse, or help with a costume change—so I walked around the outside of the theater and took my usual place on the courthouse stairs where I could watch the show through a narrow slot in the wall.

While I was watching I heard noises coming from the hall above me. At first I thought it was an echo of the actors’ voices, but I soon realized it was the sound of woman crying, very softly in the empty courthouse.

Of course there was no one there, I looked through the glass inset in the door and the doors were locked.  To verify the event, I went back downstairs and got one of the actors who didn’t need to go back on stage until the second act and asked him to come with me. We both heard it and listened until the sound of applause told us the first act was over.

Having done a bit of research on the building I knew that at least one of the girls had been killed by a customer and another had committed suicide. I don’t know which of these women we heard, or even if it was one of them, but it was very sad.

I was to hear the crying woman again many times before I left.

The theater, I am sad to say, is now defunct, but I hope the weeping lady has found some peace.

 

 

FOOTLIGHTERS THEATER

FOOTLIGHTERS THEATER

Berwyn, PA

Redundant church

 

 

Submitted by horror author PD Cacek & read by British folksinger David Walton

 

 

Listen to the audio version from Episode 32: Women in Horror

 

It took a few years, but my nearsightedness finally got bad enough to get me on stage. I still built sets, but from time to time I gathered up my courage, took off my glasses, and got into character.

It was during one of these builds, while most of the other actor/builders were still down in the greenroom eating lunch, that I came upstairs to check sight lines (the outermost area of the stage that can be seen by the audience). I was sitting in a chair to the extreme left of center when one of the actresses walked up the center aisle. At first I only caught her out of the corner of my eye, but saw that she was in costume—a period piece with a long black shirt and high-necked, long sleeved white blouse—but when I turned to say hi…no one was there.

I got up and walked to the stairs leading down to the greenroom, thinking she’d turned around, only to find the rest of the cast and crew coming back upstairs. When I asked them about the woman in the costume, they asked me to describe her. When I did, the director said, “Oh, that’s just Lydia, our ghost.”

Ah, that would explain it.

That was my initial meeting with Lydia. Lydia is a very social ghost with a “lively” sense of humor and loves nothing more than playing with the theater lights. I remember one time when the rehearsal ran very late and it was all we poor actors could do was drag ourselves out to our cars. Everything was off except the house lights, which the director would turn off when he left. When the majority of us were in the lobby, holding open the outside door, the director turned off the house lights…and a center spot snapped on.

Sigh.

The light booth was empty, but it’s an old theater and sometimes a switch isn’t turned completely off, so the house lights were turned back on and a volunteer dragged himself back up the spiral stairs to the light booth. He did, in fact, find the switch turned back into the ON position and turned it off…making sure it wasn’t a short by turning the light on and off a few times before coming back down.  However, the moment the director turned off the house lights the spot came on again.

Hah. Hah.

We just looked at each other until the director told Lydia we were all too tired to play and she could leave the light on if she wanted to. Just as we were pulling the front door shut, we all heard a clicks when the spot went out.

Another time I got to the theater early a bit early to do a little prep work before getting into costume (I was playing a 13th Century Nun). I’d put my things in the dressing room and came upstairs thought the house, did a visual check of the set (it had been a bear to build) then went out into the lobby to pick up a program where I found a fellow cast member (and our computer expert) checking ticket sales for that night’s performance.

He smiled and told me I had a lovely singing voice and asked why I didn’t do more musicals.  I asked him what the heck he was talking about. He said he’d heard me singing downstairs and just wanted to tell me how beautiful he thought my voice was.  I told him not only wasn’t I singing but that I don’t generally don’t sing (unless it’s in the shower or under directorial threat). He went a bit pale and asked me if I was teasing him. I swore I wasn’t. When he asked if I’d heard a woman singing I said I hadn’t, but suggested he might have heard someone singing outside the theater.

He said the singing had come from the dressing rooms downstairs—where I had been and hadn’t heard anything.

He told the story to the rest of the cast and one of them remembered hearing a woman sing, this time on the stage, when he…and only he was there alone.

Lydia is a song bird with a lovely voice…and she’s not alone. From time to time I got the impression of a small boy, around six years of age, wearing a pale blue “sailor suit” circa 1890s or thereabout. When I asked others about him no one seemed to know anything about a small boy, but said he might have been Lydia’s son. Both of them had been buried in the cemetery when the theater had been a church. When the church was made redundant the cemetery and its inhabitants were moved.

But it seems as though Lydia and her son decided to stay on.

 

 

FORGE THEATER

FORGE THEATER

Phoenixville, PA

Former funeral home

 

Submitted by horror author PD Cacek

Read by British folksinger David Walton

Listen to Forge Theater true ghost story narrated by David Walton from episode 35: STRANGE DAYS


Once Neiman Funeral Home, Forge Theater has not only has been verified as being haunted but is also a stop on the Phoenixville Ghost Tour.

I’d heard about the theater from a friend who’d performed there and couldn’t wait to see it—especially the ticket booth which was once the site of the casket lift. I mean how could I NOT want to see it…let alone volunteer there. To be honest, I hadn’t heard it was haunted or on the ghost tour when I showed up, I just knew it was. Sometimes you can feel it even before you walk through the door.

Soit came as no great shock when I walked in and asked who their ghost was and got the answer “Mr. Neiman.” Everyone knows Mr. Neiman, everyone accepts Mr. Neiman and, above all, everyone respects Mr. Neiman.

It was not only his business, but he home after all.

And he still lives there…in the costume loft.

I’ve never been up to the loft. I could, but I’ve only ever gotten as far as the stairs leading up to it before turning around. It’s not fear that keeps me out, but the feeling that I’d be trespassing. I know the costumers don’t feel particularly welcome sometimes, but, as they say, the shows must go on and Mr. Neiman is very good about putting up with all the intrusions.

I believe I caught a glimpse of him once, peeking out from the stairwell leading up to loft. It could have only been a shadow, but I nodded and the shadow nodded back. Mr. Neiman is what is called an “intelligent haunt”— a spirit that interacts with his living counterparts, unlike the “residual haunting” of the Morrison Theater’s crying woman.

Mr. Neiman haunts Forge Theater, but I don’t think he haunts alone. There is something downstairs, in the combination greenroom/dressing rooms that make the hairs on the back of my neck stand up each and every time I go down there. When the theater was still a funeral home, this was the area where the bodies were prepared…and I think someone is still there.

The only sense I have of it—not even sure if the entity is male or female, although I lean toward male—is anger, a very cold, bone-numbing anger that can be felt even on the hottest days.

I haven’t asked about it simply because this is where the actors spend most of their time and I don’t want to worry anyone, but the more time I spend at the theater, the more I feel it…and get the sense that it also feels me.

This could get interesting. Stay tuned….

Listen to the full episode here!

35: STRANGE DAYS

 

Listen to EPISODE 35: Strange Days –

 

 

Strange days we’re living in. Horror authors T. Fox Dunham & Phil Thomas make them stranger with Episode 35.

Horror author PD Cacek includes her latest installment of Repeat Performances, a series of ghosts stories set in various theaters around the country. Forge Theater once against features actors and theater staff who just refuse to move on from the stage. Forge Theater is nearby Phil and Fox in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. Narrated by British folksinger, David Walton.

The only sense I have of it—not even sure if the entity is male or female, although I lean toward male—is anger, a very cold, bone-numbing anger that can be felt even on the hottest days.

Forge Theater in Phoenixville PA

From Forge Theater true ghost story, part of Repeat Performances from PD Cacek.

 

WOMEN IN HORROR MONTH

We’re celebrating Women in Horror Month by interviewing important women voices in the horror industry. On Episode 35, Fox interviews author Shannon Giglio, author of Short Bus Hero.

They talk about the challenges women horror authors have to face and she gives advice to new authors struggling to get their start. Fox shares a reading from her current work in progress, Strange as Angels. Oh! Shannon’s disappointed David Bowie hasn’t returned to tell us about the afterlife.

 

After a few uncomfortable moments, during which Flynn was sure he was either dying or losing his mind, the woman printed out a boarding pass and smiled as she laid it on the counter. “Just as I thought. The eyes and the heart never lie.” She smiled, fixing her eyes again on his chest.From Strange as Angels, work in progress by Shannon Giglio.

 

Shannon Giglio is a writer of literary, transgressive, and dark fiction. She has lived abroad, traveled widely, jumped out of an airplane and driven a race car. She has worked in film and television. She currently lives on the Georgia coast with her husband, author Peter Giglio. She is represented by Daniel Lazar, Writers House.

 

ZAPA!

Miguel Zapata European folksinger.

And, in their tireless search for indie music and because their recording day was snowed out, the hosts feature two songs from folk performer Zapa: the very dark melodies, Ghost and Strange Strangers. Strange strangers, strange angels and strange authors on EPISODE 35: Strange Days. For more information on this talented musician, artists and performer, check out his website.

Here are two clips from one of Zapa’s gig, which took place at the lovely Belmont in A Coruna, Spain in July. He thanks  his friends Andrea Ratto and Luis Moro. His great friend Borja ‘Smooth Fingers’ Highlight for the keys.


 

 

They’re on PARA-X RADIO at 9PM EST on FRIDAYs.

Follow us on Twitter: @pfwhatafraidof

para-x-logo_social_400x400

Listen for us on PARA-X RADIO at our usual time slot on FRIDAY NIGHTS at 9PM EST.

PMMP LOGO

Sponsored in part by Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing.

RavenAmpersand

MERCY

(A Horror Medical Thriller Novel from Blood Bound Books.)

MERCY LARGE

By T. Fox Dunham

(Host of What Are You Afraid of Horror & Paranormal Podcast)

FANGORIA gives MERCY 3.5 out 4 Skulls – “Dunham has channeled his many brushes with the other side into the exquisitely rendered, lyrical supernatural hospital thriller MERCY.READ FULL REVIEW HERE.

fangoria

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Author Tim Waggoner

Part medical horror, part supernatural suspense, MERCY is a hard-hitting fever dream of a novel. I enjoyed the hell out of it!” ~ Tim Waggoner, author of The Way of All Flesh and Eat The Night

Pain and poetry flow in equal measure through these pages. Dunham’s prose strikes deep and hits all the right notes. MERCY is unforgettably vivid.” ~ David Dunwoody, author of Hell Walks and The 3 Egos

William Saint is dying of cancer. On most days death seems like a humane alternative to the treatment. Stricken with fever, William is rushed to Mercy—notorious as a place to send the sickest of the poor and uninsured to be forgotten—and finds the hospital in even worse condition than his previous visit. The grounds are unkempt, the foundation is cracking, and like the wild mushrooms sprouting from fissures of decay around it, something is growing inside the hospital. Something dark. It’s feeding on the sickness and sustaining itself on the staff, changing them. And now it wants Willie.

This was my death.

Life is an addiction.

Love is the only force that is real. Read . . . and understand what I saw. I put it in metaphor. You do not understand what you do not understand.

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Author of Mercy – T. Fox Dunham

Buy on Kindle at Amazon

Or Buy in Paperback at Amazon

 

Music & Photo Rights:

Ghosts by Zapa is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License.

Strange Stranger by Zapa is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License.

The Long Trick by Zapa is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License.

“Tranquility” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

“Lamentation” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

“Come Play With Me” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

“The Chamber” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

© Can Stock Photo / popovaphoto

34: HORROR WORLD

Listen to EPISODE 34: HORROR WORLD

It is a world of demons, ghosts and monsters. Horror authors T. Fox Dunham & Phil Thomas revel in it, exploring the darkness and keeping you informed about the current state of ghouls in the world. The ghouls are coming to get you. And we’ll be following, laughing.

Who is the man in the hat? He appears before your bed as a harbinger of darkness and bad times. He comes leading a pack of ghosts that infest your home or brings terrible tragedy to your life. Phil Thomas discusses this specter of urban legend. Fox keeps everyone updated on the epidemic of demonic possessions of high schools in Jamaica. Yes, it’s a thing there.

 

 

Horror author PD Cacek shares another of her haunted theater stories, talking about the crying woman and the gentlemen ghosts of the Morrison Theater, a building that used to be a house of ill repute. Dark jazz man Wily Bo Walker returns with the Rattlin Bone Theater with his macabre song, Little Gina.

They finish their Dark Ones authors’ series with a reading of John Foster’s dark work of spies in Eastern Europe, Mister White read by Daniel Braum at the KGB Bar and Lit Club in NYC. Who is Mister White? Don’t say his name! Published by Grey Matter Press.

From the Dark Ones Rise at the KGB Bar and Lit Club in the East Village, NYC.

We return next week with our next Women in Horror episode. Check out the website for expanded content and our archive of recorded ghost stories at www.whatareyouafraidofpodcast.com. Twitter @pfwhatafraidof